quarta-feira, 24 de fevereiro de 2010

Dicas para escrever (III)





My most important rule is one that sums up the 10. If it sounds like writing, I rewrite it.
10 rules for writing by Elmore Leonard


For homework, pull a few books down off the shelf and look for examples of the Head or Heart scenes where the author is establishing authority. They tend to be early in a book, where the authority is most needed. And where establishing it won't slow down the escalating plot. For homework, write an anecdote that establishes your authority with honesty and vulnerability. For this, risk telling a painful, embarrassing story. The story of a scar or a humiliation. The glory of this risk is how it prompts other people to risk telling their own stories, and gives people an instant feeling of freedom and relief.
Then, write an anecdote that establishes authority using knowledge and data. You might have to do some research to establish a "body of knowledge." One good method is to meet and casually interview someone about what they know best typically, what they do for a living. You'll notice that people always look wonderful - when they speak with the authority of their profession.
Chuck Palahniuk Writing Essays 01 to 36



1. WHAT IT'S ALL ABOUT IS "WHO" 
2. THE THREE GREATEST RULES OF DRAMATIC WRITING:
3. THE TYRANNY OF THE PREMISE, OR,WRITING A STORY WITHOUT A PREMISE IS LIKE ROWING A BOAT WITHOUT OARS
4. THE ABC'S OF STORYTELLING 
5. RISING TO THE CLIMAX, OR, THE PROOF OF THE PUDDING IS IN THE PREMISE 
6. VIEWPOINT, POINT OF VIEW, FLASHBACKING, AND SOME NIFTY GADGETS IN THE NOVELIST'S BAG OF TRICKS
7. THE FINE ART OF GREAT DIALOGUE AND SENSUOUS, DRAMATIC PROSE
8. REWRITING: THE FINAL AGONIES
9. THE ZEN OF NOVEL WRITING
BIBLIOGRAPHY
How to write a damn good novel e Advanced techniques for dramatic storytelling by James N. Frey.



Writing fiction is a solitary art.
When an orchestra performs a symphony, it's a shared effort. Not only are there many musicians playing their instruments, there's also a conductor helping them sound good together. Yet before any of them plays a note, a composer has to write the musical score.
There's even more teamwork with a play or movie. Lots of actors, of course; a director to guide, suggest, decide for the group; designers of sets, costumes, lighting, and sound; technicians to carry out those designs. In film, add the vital work of the cinematographer, camera operators, and editors.
But before any of this work can be done, a writer has to put together a script.

Script or score, those group performances existed because somebody had a plan. Somebody composed the music before ever a note was heard; somebody composed the story before ever an actor spoke a word. Composition first, then performance.
We who write fiction have no team of actors or musicians to do our bidding, so it's easy to forget that our work, too, has a composition stage and a performance stage. We are both composer and performer. Or rather, we are both storyteller and writer.

The actual writing of the story, along with the creation of the text, the choice of words, the dialogue, the style, the tone, the point of view- that is the performance, that is the part of our work that earns us the title "writer."
The invention of the characters and situations and events, along with the construction of plot and scene, the ordering of events, the complications and twists, the setting and historical background-that is the composition, the part of our work that earns us the title "storyteller."

There is no clear separation of our two roles. As we invent and construct our fiction, we will often do it with language-we jot down notes, tell scenes to our friends, write detailed outlines or synopses. And as we are performing our stories, writing them out in our most effective prose, we also invent new details or motivations, discover new relationships
Characters and viewpoint by Orson Scott Card



If you're like me and most of the writers I've known over the years in writers' groups, at conferences and in classes, you're coming to plot the hard way. A scene, a bit of dialogue, a character sets you happily scribbling or keyboarding away. And then, too often, something happens. The story starts to slow and go
sour, dead ending in frustrated scraps of revision. It's eventually tossed with the rest of the might-have-beens—in the bottom of your sock drawer or even in the wastebasket.
PLOT by Ansen Dibell



On the Writing of Speculative Fiction - Robert A. Heinlein
Dialog - Isaac Asimov
You and Your Characters - James Patrick Kelly
Seeing Your Way to Better Stories - Stanley Schmidt
Turtles All the Way Down - Jane Yolen
Learning to Write Comedy, Why It's Impossible and How to Do It- Connie Willis
Good Writing Is Not Enough - Stanley Schmidt
The Creation of Imaginary Worlds - Poul Anderson
Writing SF - vários autores


10 rules for writing by Elmore Leonard. Chuck Palahniuk Writing Essays 01 to 36. How to write a damn good novel e Advanced techniques for dramatic storytelling by James N. Frey. Characters and viewpoint by Orson Scott Card. Plot by Ansen Dibell. Writing SF - vários autores [ Download ]